Get Some Culture

Hello Good Folks!

Black History Month is starting off strong with some fabulous events kicking off today.

This evening is the opening reception of the Dandy Lion: Articulating a Re(de)fined Black Masculine Identity.  The exibition will be on view at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum in Baltimore from January 29 – May 13, 2012.  Curated by Shantrelle P. Lewis the exibit features photography and films by:

Hanif Abdur-Rahim
Kwesi Abbensetts
Laylah Amatullah Barrayn
Kia Chenelle
Bouba Dola
Delphine Fawundu-Buford
Russsell K. Frederick
Cassi Amanda Gibson
Akintola Hanif
Jamala Johns
Caroline W. Kaminju
Phillis Kwentoh
Jati Lindsay
Lafotographeuse (née Amanda Adams-Louis)
Ray Llanos
Devin Mays
Terence Nance
Brandi Pettijohn
Radcliffe Roye
Nyugen E. Smith

January 29 – May 13

Reginald F. Lewis Museum

830 E Pratt St Baltimore, MD 21202

Opening Reception- February 2

6-8PM

RSVP required. Call 443-263-1854.

Leave your name and the total number of people in your party.

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The Smithsonian National Museum of African Art presents African Art House Film Festival every Thursday in February.

Landmark E Street Cinema

555 11th Street NW

6:30PM

First-come, first-served tickets available at theater box office day of screening

Limit of 4 passes per person

February 2

Man On Ground          U.S. premiere!

Dir. Akin Omotoso. South Africa 2011. 90 min, English with Yoruba, Sotho, Zulu.

An indie thriller that portrays the rising xenophobia against Nigerian immigrants in South Africa.

Q & A with director Akin Omotoso and actor Hakeem Kae Kazim

February 9

Touki Bouki

Dir. Djibril Diop Mambety. Senegal 1973. 85 min., Wolof, Arabic, French with English subtitles.

This classic road movie from Senegal follows two young lovers living in Dakar who long for Paris and concoct schemes to pay their way.

Q & A with film historian Françoise Pfaff (Howard University)

February 16

Aristotle’s Plot

Dir. Jean-Pierre Bekolo. Zimbabwe /Cameroon 1996. 71 min.

With a heavy dose of satire, this postmodern film questions if Africans prefer high art festival films or American action flicks.

Q & A with film historian Mbye Cham (Howard University)

February 23

The Nine Muses

Dir. John Akomfrah. Alaska and archival material, 2011. 94 min.

This beautiful and enigmatic documentary film mixes archival material and original scenes, and considers mass migration to post-war Britain from 1949 to 1970 as a parallel to Homer’s The Odyssey.

Q & A with director John Akomfrah

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